Cloud Migration

Experience has taught us that first steps to a successful migration are to learn what immediate needs, mid range and long term needs are expected to be met by moving from servers and services that were previously in house to a third party.

Many people have moved some part of their business to the cloud. Now they are considering the next step to moving fully online or are regretting that first move. One of the things we excel at is the ability to sit down and find out what the goal is and then go find the best solution for our customer. Sometimes that also includes helping them implement the solution or just providing the solution.

Experience has taught us that first steps to a successful migration are to learn what immediate needs, mid range and long term needs are expected to be met by moving from servers and services that were previously in house to a third party. In some cases it’s fairly straight forward. For example, you want to utilize something like mailchimp to manage your customer newsletters instead of knocking them out in Word. While simple on the face of it, there is time and consideration that should be spent determining how long it will take to get all your emails uploaded and creating the campaigns themselves. 

For more complex projects, like changing email hosting to Google or Microsoft the impact analysis can take days or even weeks if planned correctly. There are is so much that technology in offices today that even an experienced user may simple overlook as an obstacle. For example, many of those big copiers in an office aren’t nearly as high tech as you might think and can be a struggle to get to work with modern, secure email standards. The same is true for older (and not so old) phone systems. Even those made my Cisco and other top brands. 

When changing large, expensive line of business products to even the same vendor unexpected issues can bring the project to a screaming halt. One of our customers scans everything into their accounting package. When making the transition to the latest version of the product from that vendor it was learned that they would only support B&W scans. Well, that almost killed the project as the items the customer scanned were on colored paper and the scans were unreadable in B&W. We did find a way around this issue and successfully fought the vendor about trying to charge more for color scans.


Finally, we also exam the “exit barrier”. Basically, how hard is it to leave the provider should that day come. It’s one thing to be told “oh yes, your data is totally yours.” It’s another to find that what that really means is “here’s an XML file that’s really only useful on our platform but it DOES have your data in it.”  Forewarned allows for appropriate planning.

We know the right questions to ask on your behalf because we believe your success is our success.